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Grammar Tag Articles

 

 

 

Whoever/Whenever Grammar: Nadal vs Djokovic - whoever lost, we won

Whoever/Whenever Grammar: Nadal vs Djokovic - whoever lost, we won

An awesome tennis match and an even more incredible explanation of whoever, wherever, whichever, whatever & however!

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Student blogcast

Student blogcast

The first Student Podcast on the blog is full of interesting talking points, including recommendations, jokes, grammar (used to), games and the news!

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Used to: Boxing Day

Used to: Boxing Day

What did people used to do on Boxing Day? Full grammar explanation of 'used to + infinitive' and 'used to + -ing'

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So / Such…that Grammar: The X factor is so bad that…

So / Such…that Grammar: The X factor is so bad that…

Reality singing contests are so annoying that they make you want to throw up: grammar explanation of so vs such included

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Passive Grammar: Rooney is banned!

Passive Grammar: Rooney is banned!

Grammar explanation of all tenses in the passive.

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1st conditional: Scream, if you’re superstitious about Friday 13th

1st conditional: Scream, if you’re superstitious about Friday 13th

Friday was a special day but unfortunately not in a good way. Friday 13th in the UK is considered unlucky, and because of a horror film from the 1970s, it is also now associated to anything scary.

Why Friday the 13th?

Nobody knows exactly why Friday 13th is considered unlucky, but people think it is to do with being scared of the number 13 and Friday.

In the Christian faith, Judas was the 13th person at the table of the Last Supper and he, of course, was the traitor to Jesus.

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Phone Spying Scandal Calls Again

Phone Spying Scandal Calls Again

Phone hacking scandal returns and is a good example of the passive voice in English

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2011 – A Year of Protest? – The grammar of future predictions

2011 – A Year of Protest? – The grammar of future predictions

‘I predict a riot!’ sing the Kaiser Chiefs and I think that is a good way to describe how I feel about 2011.

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Explaining the Past – Terrorist Attack!

Explaining the Past – Terrorist Attack!

The story of the attempted terrorist attack on 5th November by Guy Fawkes shows us how to use the past tenses in English grammar (past simple, past continuous, past perfect, past perfect continuous and used to).

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Create the perfect sentence

Create the perfect sentence

english tipsStudents often feel the need to 'learn grammar' so that they can construct accurate sentences and use them in their speech and writing. There are many ways of doing this. Below is one way you can practise writing sentences that are accurate and meaningful. Look at the front page of a newspaper like the Times or the Guardian. Read the headlines.

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