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10 New Year’s Resolutions for Learning English

10 New Year’s Resolutions for Learning English

It is hard to believe but we have almost reached the end of another year, and that can only mean one thing: it is time to reflect and set some goals for the year to come.  Indeed, it is a tradition in the UK to make a list of New Year’s resolutions, which are about being better people and doing better in life.

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Proud to Be a Stickler: How to Use an Apostrophe

Proud to Be a Stickler: How to Use an Apostrophe

Do you have doubts about using punctuation marks? Do you sometimes put them in the wrong position, or avoid using them altogether? If so, you’re not alone; many people find punctuation difficult to navigate, especially when the same symbols might vary in usage across different languages. However, it is important to get it right: correct punctuation will help make your writing clear and effective and will make it easier for the reader to understand what you want to express.

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Dos and Don’ts of CV Writing

Dos and Don’ts of CV Writing

Are you planning to look for a job in the UK? Recruiters may have just a few seconds to scan your CV so it is vital that yours stands out from the rest. Here are some tips on how to produce a professional-sounding CV in English:

Do put your name, address and contact details (with a professional-sounding email address) at the top of your CV. You don’t need to write ‘CV’ as your name should act as a title.

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Classic British Movies That Everyone Should Watch

Classic British Movies That Everyone Should Watch

We’ve picked out some classic British movies that we think should be part of everyone’s lives, especially when they are learning English as a foreign language!

Here are our favourite movies, check out the list and see if you've missed any from 'Billy Elliot' to 'Four Weddings and a Funeral'...

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English Sayings You'll Only Hear in the UK

English Sayings You'll Only Hear in the UK

We often hear someone say: ​"I’m gutted."
Do you know what it means?

As someone learning English as a second language, you will usually only be taught to speak the language 'correctly'. But what exactly is the correct use of a language? Surely, as someone who is intent on learning a new language and culture to integrate into British society, you actually want to know how to communicate with the people in your community on a casual level too?

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Writing Your Christmas Cards in English for the First Time

Writing Your Christmas Cards in English for the First Time

When learning English, it is a great idea to practise your writing skills in different ways. From writing letters and postcards to typing emails and text messages, there are many different ways to practise these new skills.

One useful and festive way is to write your own Christmas cards to friends and family who speak English. Read on for some tips on writing a Christmas card for the first time.

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Fun English Songs to sing to your kids

Fun English Songs to sing to your kids

Learning a new language when you are an adult can be a challenge. If English is not your first language, you could need lessons in order to be able to speak it fluently. Thankfully, there are many resources out there for you to use.

When you have children, the challenge can be two-fold. Teaching yourself and your children at the same time may sound difficult, but really, it’s as easy as ABC!

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Learning English from The Greatest Film and Television You’ve Ever Seen

Learning English from The Greatest Film and Television You’ve Ever Seen

We love encouraging our students to find alternative ways to bolster their English language skills outside the classroom. One way in which people like to learn foreign languages is by watching films in their chosen language. These resources are stimulating, motivating, flexible, fun, and effective. Furthermore, the visuality of film enabling learners to enjoy and understand more by interpreting the language in a full visual context. But how can you find great movies and TV to watch and how can you learn from them once you have?

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20 Day English - Day 20: Passive sentences grammar quiz

20 Day English - Day 20: Passive sentences grammar quiz

Passive sentences are all about changing the focus of what you are talking about.

For example: Somebody stole my bike (this is a normal ACTIVE sentence)

Subject, verb, object

Subject = Somebody (the person doing the verb)

Verb = stole (the past simple of 'to steal')

Object = my bike

But I am not interested in that horrible 'somebody'. I am MORE interested in my poor little bike.

So, by changing to a sentence with passive grammar, the whole focus of what I am saying changes.

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20 Day English - Day 19: Third Conditional English grammar quiz

20 Day English - Day 19: Third Conditional English grammar quiz

Third conditionals (sometimes called Type 3 conditionals) are sentences where the speaker is thinking about the past and how it could have been different.

So, normally a 3rd conditional sentence expresses some kind of regret.

This grammar construction is sometimes known as a 'true hypothetical' and that is a good description because we are always talking about somehow changing the past, but as no-one has invented a time machine, it is impossible to go back and change the past, so all 3rd conditional sentences are therefore 100% hypothetical

 

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