History of the English Language

English Grammar Tag Articles

 

 

 

20 Day English - Day 20: Passive sentences grammar quiz

20 Day English - Day 20: Passive sentences grammar quiz

Passive sentences are all about changing the focus of what you are talking about.

For example: Somebody stole my bike (this is a normal ACTIVE sentence)

Subject, verb, object

Subject = Somebody (the person doing the verb)

Verb = stole (the past simple of 'to steal')

Object = my bike

But I am not interested in that horrible 'somebody'. I am MORE interested in my poor little bike.

So, by changing to a sentence with passive grammar, the whole focus of what I am saying changes.

Share this page:

Relevant English Courses designed to improve your English

 

 

 

20 Day English - Day 10: Present perfect vs past simple grammar quiz

20 Day English - Day 10: Present perfect vs past simple grammar quiz

Present perfect is a grammar tense that causes a lot of problems for learners and results in lots of mistakes.

It is difficult for students to separate the past simple and the present perfect in their mind.

Often  it is because there is no direct translation for present perfect in students' own mother tongue language.

The best way to think about these tenses is this:

 

PAST SIMPLE

When you are thinking/speaking/writing about an action from the past that has definitely finished, then use the PAST SIMPLE.

Share this page:

Relevant English Courses designed to improve your English

 

 

 

20 Day English - Day 9: English Grammar 50/50 Quiz

20 Day English - Day 9: English Grammar 50/50 Quiz

We are almost at the end of week 2 of the 20 Day English challenge to boost your English in 5 minutes every day.

Today the short test will challenge your knowledge of grammar. 

Specifically, the questions will cover small, annoying and tricky grammar issues like

Share this page:

Relevant English Courses designed to improve your English

 

 

 

20 Day English - Day 6: Upper intermediate idioms quiz

20 Day English - Day 6: Upper intermediate idioms quiz

Idioms are those phrases in English like "It's not my cup of tea". A group of words that when put together have a meaning that is completely different than the individual words would suggest.

There are really common idioms that students learn even at beginner level, like the one above with that famous cup of tea, meaning (I don't like that thing) or "it's a piece of cake" (meaning - it's very easy) 

Share this page:

Relevant English Courses designed to improve your English

 

 

 

20 Day English - Day 5: Advanced phrasal verbs grammar quiz

20 Day English - Day 5: Advanced phrasal verbs grammar quiz

We are at the end of the first week of the SGI 20 Day English Challenge!

I hope you have completed all the other quick quizzes every day to give a nice boost to your English language skills.

Share this page:

Relevant English Courses designed to improve your English

 

 

 

20 Day English - Day 4: Prepositions in v on v at English grammar quiz

20 Day English - Day 4: Prepositions in v on v at English grammar quiz

Day Four of the 20 day English challenge! Today we have a quiz for you to test your knowledge of English grammar.

If you are just joining us now there are the previous 3 day's tests to complete to boost your English knowledge

Day 1: Spelling quiz

Day 2: Email sentences test

Share this page:

Relevant English Courses designed to improve your English

 

 

 

Would have vs would of in English grammar

Would have vs would of in English grammar

Should you write 'would have' or 'would of'?

Is there a difference between the two?

Is would've a word?

The problem with this English grammar issue is that when you SAY 'would have' out loud, it can sound like 'would of'.

It is a mistake that people make a lot, even some native speakers of English make this mistake!

 

WOULD HAVE

Examples:

Share this page:

Relevant English Courses designed to improve your English

 

 

 

Grammar Test - Your v You're, It's v its and their v they're

Grammar Test - Your v You're, It's v its and their v they're

When do you use you're and when do you use your?

What's the difference between it's and its?

How do you use they're or their and there?

(If you think you already know, go to the bottom of this page and take the grammar test. If you are not sure, keep reading... and then take the test)

Share this page:

Relevant English Courses designed to improve your English

 

 

 

The 3 worst English grammar mistakes to avoid

The 3 worst English grammar mistakes to avoid

Native speakers make English grammar mistakes every day!

Sometimes it is because the person changes their mind halfway through a sentence:

Example - I haven't seen her... yesterday.*

The person was perhaps going to say something like, "I haven't seen her this week".

But then perhaps the speaker suddenly thought about yesterday. In this sentence, the present perfect grammar tense should be replaced with past simple because of the use of the time marker adverb, yesterday.

Share this page:

Relevant English Courses designed to improve your English

 

 

 

There vs Their vs They're. The Difference In English Grammar.

There vs Their vs They're. The Difference In English Grammar.

There, their or they're? Which one should you use?

Learn the grammar rules and then take our GRAMMAR QUIZ AT THE BOTTOM OF THIS PAGE.

Or if you think you already know how to use THEY'RE & THEIR & THERE, you can take a 10-question apostrophe grammar test here

Actually this is a problem for learners and also even for a lot of English native speakers.

Share this page:

Relevant English Courses designed to improve your English

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - English grammar